Bestselling Authors Discussing Their Works

Writers LIVE!, the Library’s flagship author event series, returns for another season of bringing the community together with authors and their books. The 2021 lineup of bestselling, critically acclaimed, and award-winning authors will be discussing their work virtually via Zoom.

Local, independent booksellers will have featured titles available for purchase. A percentage of each sale will be donated to the Friends of the Palm Beach County Library—directly benefiting library services and activities, supporting local business, and encouraging the love of reading. Whether for your home library or giving a perfect gift, all purchases are greatly appreciated!

Thank you to our Writers LIVE! 2021 retailers:

This series is made possible through the generous support of the Friends of the Palm Beach County Library System, Inc.

Current Registrations

Past Writers LIVE! Events

Missed out on our previous Writers LIVE! author talks? Visit our past events in 2021 section to watch on demand.

Past Events in 2021

Since 2012, Colleen Hover has been delighting readers with novels spanning across genres – from thrillers to aching romances to family stories that tug at your heart strings. Her numerous novels include, “Regretting You,” “It Ends With Us,” and, “Verity,”—all #1 New York Times bestsellers. Now, for the first time in her distinguished career comes her first paranormal romance. Haunting, atmospheric and romantic, “Layla,” explores life after tragedy and the enduring spirt of love. Hoover lives in Texas with her husband and their three boys.

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Mamta Chaudhry’s fiction, poetry and feature articles have been published in the Miami Review, The Illustrated Weekly of India, The Telegraph, The Statesman, Writer’s Digest and The Rotarian, among others. “Haunting Paris,” her debut novel, has received praise from the New York Times Book Review, Jewish Book Council and Publisher’s Weekly. It is a timeless story of love and loss that takes a mysterious turn when a bereaved pianist discovers a letter among her late lover’s possessions, launching her into a decades-old search for a child who vanished in the turbulence of wartime Paris. Chaudhry lives with her husband in Coral Gables, Florida, and they spend part of each year in India and France.

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Alexandra Chang grew up in San Francisco, Shanghai, and Davis, California, and currently lives in Philadelphia. Her fiction has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Glimmer Train and LARB Quarterly Journal, to name a few. She graduated from Syracuse University’s M.F.A. program in 2018. Before that, she worked as a staff writer for Cornell University, WIRED and Macworld. In Alexandra’s debut novel, “Days of Distraction,” the main character finds herself facing misgivings about her role in an interracial relationship. Captivated by the stories of her ancestors and other Asian Americans in history, she must confront a question at the core of her identity: How do you exist in a society that does not notice or understand you? Equal parts tender and humorous, and told in spare but powerful prose, “Days of Distraction,” is an offbeat coming-of-adulthood tale, a touching family story, and a razor-sharp appraisal of our times.

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Internationally acclaimed, bestselling author Edwidge Danticat shares a collection of vividly imagined stories about community, family and love in, “Everything Inside: Stories.” Set in locales from Miami and Port-au-Prince to a small-unnamed country in the Caribbean and beyond, this is the indelible work of a keen observer of the human heart–a master at her best. Danticat’s memoir, “Brother, I'm Dying,” was a 2007 finalist for the National Book Award and a 2008 winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for autobiography. She is a 2009 MacArthur fellow, a 2018 Ford Foundation “The Art of Change” fellow and the winner of the 2018 Neustadt International Prize.

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Jacob Goldstein is the co-host of the popular NPR podcast, “Planet Money.” A graduate of Stanford University and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, he has written about money for The New York Times Magazine, and his stories air regularly on, “This American Life,” “All Things Considered,” and, “Morning Edition.” In “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing,” Goldstein shows how money is a made-up thing, a shared fiction, and only works because we all agree to believe in it. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and two children.

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Safia Elhillo is the author of the poetry collection, “The January Children,” which received the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets and a 2018 Arab American Book Award. Sudanese by way of Washington, D.C., she holds an M.F.A. from The New School, a Cave Canem Fellowship and a 2018 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation. Safia is a 2019-2021 Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, Pushcart Prize nominee, co-winner of the 2015 Brunel International African Poetry Prize, and listed in Forbes Africa's 2018 "30 Under 30." “Home Is Not a Country,” is Ehillo’s mesmerizing novel in verse about family, identity and finding yourself in the most unexpected places.

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Zara Raheem received her M.F.A. from California State University, Long Beach. She is the recipient of the James I. Murashige Jr. Memorial award in fiction and was selected as one of 2019s Harriet Williams Emerging Writers. In Raheem’s fresh, funny, smart debut, “The Marriage Clock,” a young, Muslim-American woman is given three months to find the right husband or else her traditional Indian parents will find one for her—a universally relatable story about the challenges of falling in love. She resides in Southern California where she teaches English and creative writing.

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Growing up in Washington, D.C., Chris Wilson was surrounded by violence and despair. He watched his family and neighborhood shattered by trauma, and he lost his faith. One night when he was seventeen, defending himself, he killed a man. He was sentenced to life in prison with no hope of parole. But what should have been the end of his story became the beginning. Behind bars, Wilson embarked on a remarkable journey of self-improvement–reading, working out, learning languages, even starting a business.

At nineteen, he sat down and wrote a list of all the things he intended to accomplish, and all the steps he’d have to take to get there. He called it his Master Plan. He revised that plan regularly and followed it religiously. Sixteen years later, it led him to an unlikely opportunity–and to a promise he has been working hard to live up to every day since. Harrowing, heartbreaking, and ultimately triumphant, “The Master Plan: My Journey From a Life in Prison to a Life of Purpose,” is a memoir for this moment, proving that every person is capable of doing great things.

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Maria Kuznetsova was born in Kiev, Ukraine, and moved to the United States as a child. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, her fiction has appeared in numerous publications such as The Southern Review, Timothy McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, Mississippi Review and the Kenyon Review Online. Her latest sharp, heartfelt novel, “Something Unbelievable,” tells the story of an overwhelmed new mom who asks to hear her grandmother’s story of her family’s desperate escape from the Nazis, causing her to discover unexpected parallels to her own life in America. Kuznetsova lives in Auburn, Alabama, with her husband and daughter, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing at Auburn University, as well as a fiction editor at The Bare Life Review, a journal of immigrant and refugee literature.

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Paul Ortiz is a professor of history and the director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. He is the author of, “Emancipation Betrayed: The Hidden History of Black Organizing and White Violence in Florida From Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920,” and an associate editor of the oral history, “Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South.” In, “An African American and Latinx History of the United States,” Ortiz has produced an intersectional history of the shared struggle for African American and Latinx civil rights. The 2018 PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Literary Award winner is a bottom-up history, told from the interconnected vantage points of Latinx and African Americans, revealing the radically different ways that people of the diaspora have addressed issues still plaguing the United States today, and it offers a way forward in the continued struggle for universal civil rights.

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